The Fishman Cometh: The Shape of Water wins Best Picture at the 90th Academy Awards!

Winners

Sam Rockwell, Frances McDormand, Allison Janney, and Gary Oldman

It went off without a hitch!  This year, the Best Picture winner was Guillermo del Toro’s love story from the Black Lagoon, The Shape of Water.  We’re sure.  We checked the envelope.  Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway were on hand again this year to present the big award as a do-over from last year’s infamous envelope gaffe.  The Shape of Water was the big winner of the night, picking up four awards: Best Picture, Best Director (Guillermo del Toro), Best Original Score, and Best Production Design.

McDormand -Oscars
Frances McDormand calling the female nominees to rise

 

The awards were spread around evenly to the Best Picture nominees, with the exception of Lady Bird. Greta Gerwig’s coming of age story set in 2002 Sacramento was nominated for five Oscars, and it did not win any. The people of the Internet are displeased. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri won awards for Sam Rockwell as Best Supporting Actor and Frances McDormand as Best Actress.  McDormand gave a rousing speech asking all of the nominated females in all of the categories to stand up and be recognized.  She then challenged the studio heads and production companies to set a meeting with these women to tell their stories.

 

Peele - Oscars
Jordan Peele celebrating his Oscar win with presenter Nicole Kidman

Gary Oldman won his first Oscar for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in Darkest Hour.  Oldman received a standing ovation from his peers as he walked to the stage to accept his award.  As is customary, he thanked his wife, his children, and mentioned his mother who will be 99 later this year. One interesting note: Oldman was previously married to another of the night’s nominee’s, Phantom Thread’s Lesley Manville. Allison Janney picked up the award for Best Supporting Actress for her work in I, Tonya, and thanked her avian costar for his help on the film.  Jordan Peele made history as the first African-American to win the award for Best Original Screenplay for his film Get Out.  I will admit, I was hoping that he would accept the film by doing his President Obama impression. Overall, the big prizes of the night went to the frontrunners.  The only surprises were that Icarus won for Best Documentary Feature and Blade Runner 2049 won the award for Best Cinematography.

Del Toro - Oscars
Guillermo del Toro

The other big winner of the night was Mexican and South American culture.  The Pixar animated film about Dia de los Muertos, Coco, won awards for Best Animated Feature Film and Best Original Song (“Remember Me”). Mexican director Guillermo del Toro won the award for Best Director, as well.  The phrase “Viva la Mexico” was uttered more times than in any other Oscar telecast.  The winner of the Best Foreign Language Film was A Fantastic Woman from Chile, the first time Chile has won in this category and only its second nomination. This was Hollywood’s way of telling President Donald Trump where he could stick his wall.

Jet Ski
Helen Mirren on a Jet Ski with costume designer Mark Bridges

Ultimately, the show was a bit of a dud.  Jimmy Kimmel’s opening was bland and safe.  The only thing slightly edgy he said was the Oscar was the perfect man because in a post-Harvey Weinstein Hollywood, a man who can keep his hands to himself and doesn’t have a penis is the best kind of man.  Other than that, it was highly unmemorable.  Throughout the show, things seemed to get progressively worse.  He decided to take a field trip with a group if 10-15 A list stars to the movie theater across the street.  The idea was to show the movie-going public the industry’s appreciation.  Like last year’s tourists who walked into the Dolby Theater, the bit fell flat and lasted far too long.  Kimmel also tried a bit where his 9 year-old self met the cast of Star Wars.  It was the most awkward two minutes of the show.  One ongoing gag that did work was the fact that Kimmel tried to get the night’s winners to keep their acceptance speeches short and sweet by telling them that the shortest speech would receive a Jet Ski.  Helen Mirren even came out to be the Price is Right-esque model and show it off while it spun around on a platform.  The winner of the Jet Ski, Mark Bridges, the costume designer of Phantom Thread with a speech that was 29 seconds long.

 

Moreno

Saint and Walken

The best part of the show was seeing Oscar winners of the past present several of the awards.  1954’s Best Supporting Actress winner for On The Waterfront, Eva Marie Saint presented the award for Best Costume Design, 1961’s Best Supporting Actress winner for West Side Story, Rita Morano (wearing the same dress that she wore to the Oscars when she won in 1962) presented the award for Best Foreign Language Film, and 1978’s Best Supporting Actor winner for The Deer Hunter, Christopher Walken presented the award for Best Original Score.  Due to allegations of sexual harassment, last year’s Best Actor winner, Casey Affleck declined the Academy’s invitation to present the award for Best Actress this year.  Instead, the award for Best Actress was presented by two-time Best Actress winner for The Accused and Silence of the Lambs Jodie Foster and the Best Actress winner for Silver Liniings Playbook, Jennifer Lawrence.  Not to be outdone, the Best Actor award was not presented by last year’s winner Emma Stone. It was instead presented by Hollywood royalty Jane Fonda (Best Actress winner for Klute and Coming Home) and Helen Mirren (Best Actress winner for The Queen).  Stone was given the honor of presenting the award for Best Director.

 

That’s it; I officially declare the 2017/2018 Awards Season closed!  What did you think of the show?  Were you hoping for a surprise ending like last year’s best picture mess-up?  Did you like Jimmy Kimmel?  Weren’t Maya Rudolph and Tiffany Haddish the best part of the show?  Let us know what you think!  Leave us a comment below or contact us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

-Ariadne Ansbro

 

Full list of winners:

Shape of Water Oscar
The cast and crew of The Shape of Water

BEST PICTURE
Call Me By Your Name
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Post
WINNER: The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Oldman - Oscar
Gary Oldman

BEST ACTOR
Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out
WINNER: Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
Denzel Washington, Roman J. Israel, Esq.

BEST ACTRESS
Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
WINNER: Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird
Meryl Streep, The Post

BEST DIRECTOR
Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan
Get Out, Jordan Peele
Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig
Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson
WINNER: The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro

Janney - Oscars
Allison Janney

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
WINNER: Allison Janney, I, Tonya
Lesley Manville, Phantom Thread
Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird
Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer, All the Money in the World
WINNER: Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
The Big Sick, Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani
WINNER: Get Out, Jordan Peele
Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig
The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Martin McDonagh

Ivory
James Ivory wins for Call Me By Your Name

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
WINNER: Call Me By Your Name, James Ivory

The Disaster Artist, Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber
Logan, Scott Frank, James Mangold, Michael Green
Molly’s Game, Aaron Sorkin
Mudbound, Virgil Williams and Dee Rees

PRODUCTION DESIGN
Beauty and the Beast
Blade Runner 2049

Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
WINNER: The Shape of Water

CINEMATOGRAPHY
WINNER: Blade Runner 2049

Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

Visual Effects
The visual effects team from Blade Runner 2049

VISUAL EFFECTS
WINNER: Blade Runner 2049

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
Kong: Skull Island
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
War for the Planet of the Apes

COSTUME DESIGN
Beauty and the Beast
Darkest Hour
WINNER: Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Victoria & Abdul

SOUND EDITING
Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049

WINNER: Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

SOUND MIXING
Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
WINNER: Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

ANIMATED SHORT FILM
WINNER: Dear Basketball

Garden Party
Lou
Negative Space
Revolting Rhymes

LIVE-ACTION SHORT FILM
DeKalb Elementary
The Eleven O’Clock
My Nephew Emmett
WINNER: The Silent Child
Watu Wote/All of Us

Desplat - Oscars
Alexandre Desplat wins for The Shape of Water

ORIGINAL SCORE
Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
WINNER: The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

FILM EDITING
Baby Driver
WINNER: Dunkirk
I, Tonya
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
WINNER:
 Darkest Hour
Victoria & Abdul

Wonder

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
WINNER: A Fantastic Woman, Chile
The Insult, Lebanon
Loveless, Russia
On Body and Soul, Hungary
The Square, Sweden

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
Edith and Eddie
WINNER: Heaven Is A Traffic Jam on the 405
Heroin(e)
Knife Skills
Traffic Stop

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Abacus: Small Enough to Jail
Faces Places
WINNER: Icarus
Last Man in Aleppo
Strong Island

Remember me
“Remember Me” from Coco

ORIGINAL SONG
“Mighty River,” Mudbound
“Mystery of Love,” Call Me By Your Name
WINNER: “Remember Me,” Coco
“Stand Up For Something,” Marshall
“This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
The Boss Baby
The Breadwinner
WINNER: Coco
Ferdinand
Loving Vincent

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MoviefiedNYC’s 2018 Oscar Predictions: Who will Win and SHOULD win!

This weekend, the 90th Academy Awards will be held and Hollywood will bestow its highest honor to a deserving few. If you are going to an Oscar party and haven’t had time to see all of the nominated films, fear not, the MoviefiedNYC team has done all of the leg work for you. Managing Editors John David West and Myrna Duarte share their predictions along with Award Season Guru Ariadne Ansbro and Eddie Mouradian cinephile MoviefiefiedNYC contributor. Below are our picks for who will win and which of the nominees should win.

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Call Me By Your Name, Darkest Hour, Dunkirk, Get Out, Lady Bird, Phantom Thread, 
The Post, The Shape of Water, and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Picture:

Call Me By Your Name, Darkest Hour, Dunkirk, Get Out, Lady Bird, Phantom Thread, 
The Post, The Shape of Water, and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Ari: Who will Win: This is really a toss-up.  The Shape of Water and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri have collectively picked up all of the pre-Oscar awards, and split them almost evenly.  I am going to say that ultimately, the fishman will steal the show and The Shape of Water will be the big winner.   Who Should Win: The film that really impressed me the most this year was Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.  This film could have been very depressing a la Rabbit Hole, but it wasn’t.  It actually ended on a positive note, which was refreshing.

David: Who will Win: The Shape of Water.  Who Should Win: The Shape of Water with a Dunkirk chaser! I would love to see a Dunkirk upset.

Eddie: Who will Win: Smart money is on Three Billboards because we live in a world where racists get a redemption arc or The Shape of Water because #FishmanSex (and it’s beautiful). But I’ve never been smart of had money so I’m calling for a Get Out upset.  Who Should Win: It’s a great year for movies when the best Steven Spielberg film in years is basically given a consolation prize. Lady Bird and  Call Me By Your Name spoke to the anguished teen inside me, but no movie–maybe ever–has made me think more than Get Out.

Myrna: Who will Win: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri and I don’t understand why. Who Should Win: The Shape of Water, a beautiful haunting political fairytale, but wouldn’t it be great to have a real upset and have the un-nominated Florida Project win.

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The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro, Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan, Get Out, Jordan Peele,
Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig, Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson

Best Director:

Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan
Get Out, Jordan Peele
Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig
Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson
The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro

Ari: Who will Win: The Mexican and Spanish directors have been cleaning up in recent years.  Welcome to their ranks, Guillermo del Toro.  Who Should Win: I would really be happy if any of them would win.  They all did a phenomenal job.

David: Who will Win and should win: Guillermo del Toro  for the The Shape of Water. Would love to see Christopher Nolan, or Paul Thomas Anderson, or Jordan Peele win as well. 

Eddie: Who will Win: Guillermo del Toro, The Shape of Water has this locked up. And it’s well-deserved and about time.   Who Should Win: Sorry folks, but Christopher Nolan‘s direction of the oddly forgotten Dunkirk was next level.

Myrna: Who will Win and Should Win: The Shape of WaterGuillermo del Toro, there are few directors that can take you into their dreams. The only upset I could live with is Jordan Peele for Get Out.

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Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour, Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread, Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name, Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out, Denzel Washington, Roman J. Israel, Esq

Best Actor:

Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out
Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
Denzel Washington, Roman J. Israel, Esq.

Ari: Who will Win: This is Gary Oldman’s year.  The only way he does not walk out of there with an Oscar is if Timothée Chalamet runs up on stage, steels it, and runs away.  Who Should Win: While it may be passe, I really enjoyed Oldman’s performance in Darkest Hour.  The film was very meh, but he elevated it and truly disappeared inside of Churchill.

David: Who will Win and should win: Gary Oldman in the Darkest Hour. It’s his to lose. If they’re running of time, Oscar telecast could just skip this category and have Emma Stone deliver the Oscar to his seat in the front row. Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name is a very close second.

Eddie: Who will Win:  Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour. I assume the space is already on his shelf. Who Should Win: Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name was revelatory and shouldn’t be denied his Oscar just because he’ll surely have other opportunities in the future.

Myrna: Who will Win and Should Win: Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour though I am concerned with all the brouhaha about Phantom Thread being Day-Lewis’s last film that he could steal the award from Oldman.

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Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water, Margot Robbie, I, Tonya, Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird, Meryl Streep, The Post

Best Actress: 

Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird
Meryl Streep, The Post

Ari: Who will Win: Frances McDormand is about to become a two-time Academy Award winner.  Who Should Win: I will probably be hanged for this, but Meryl StreepHer portrayal of Katherine Graham was filled with so many layers.  Her inner conflict and trepidation were palpable.

David: Who will Win: Frances McDormand  Who Should Win: Margot Robbie, I, Tonya. Oh, and where is Annette Bening’s name on this list? She was a bit more deserving for her performance in Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool than a few of the other nominees this year–but I’m on team Robbie.

Eddie: Who will Win: Frances McDormand, Three Billboard Outside Ebbing, Missouri will deservedly join an elite group of double Best Actress winners.  Who Should Win: I’m not mad that Franny is going to win her second Oscar, but Meryl Streep in The Post though…

Myrna:  Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. I love Frances McDormand but I don’t think this is an award-winning role for her. Who Should Win: Margot Robbie in I, Tonya truly disappears into the role of Tonya Harding.

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Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, MissouriWillem Dafoe, The Florida Project, 
Woody Harrelson, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water,
Christopher Plummer, All the Money in the World

Best Supporting Actor:

Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer, All the Money in the World
Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri 

Ari: Who will Win: This is Sam Rockwell’s year.  From the minute I saw Three Billboards, I knew that he would be the one to beat come Oscar season.  Who Should Win: Sam Rockwell.  I know that my fellow writers all think there were some writing flaws to his character, but I disagree.  He was just great in a great role.

David: Who will and Should Win: Sam Rockwell, despite some script problems, Rockwell rises above the material and delivers a killer performance in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

Eddie: Who will Win:  Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri Who Should Win: Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri–it’ s not his fault his character has a weirdly problematic and completely unearned redemption arc.

Myrna: Who will Win: Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri Who Should Win: Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project a film that deserved more nominations than it received.

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Allison Janney, I, Tonya, Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird, Lesley Manville, Phantom Thread, 
Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water, Mary J. Blige, Mudbound

Best Supporting Actress:

Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
Allison Janney, I, Tonya
Lesley Manville, Phantom Thread
Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird
Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water

Ari: Who will and should win: Allison Janney for her role as the tough as nails mother of figure skater Tonya Harding in I, Tonya.  Janney’s film work has been as exceptional as her television work and it is about damn time she was recognized. The bird deserves an award, too.

David: Who will and should Win: Allison Janney, I, Tonya. She killed, she owned it, she rocked–give Janney the prize!  HOWEVER, I would LOVE to see Lesley Manville win!

Eddie: Who will Win:  Allison Janney, I, Tonya – great performance, even greater bird. Who Should Win: Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird gave my favorite performance of the year.

Myrna: Who will Win and Should Win: Allison Janney, I, Tonya

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Logan

Best Adapted Screenplay: 

Call Me By Your Name, James Ivory
The Disaster Artist, Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber
Logan, Scott Frank, James Mangold, Michael Green
Molly’s Game, Aaron Sorkin
Mudbound, Virgil Williams and Dee Rees 

Ari: Who will Win: James Ivory (of Merchant-Ivory fame) will pick up his first Oscar for his adaptation of André  Aciman’s pretentious novel, Call Me By Your Name  Who Should Win: Aaron Sorkin, Molly’s Game should win for anything he ever does.  His writing is always head and shoulders above anyone else’s.

David: Who will and Should Win: Call Me By Your Name, James Ivory. After three previous nominations, this is his time.

Eddie: Who will Win:  Call My By Your Name, James Ivory  Who Should Win: Despite the protests of the comic book nerd and West Wing fan inside me, Call My By Your Name, James Ivory.

Myrna: Who will Win: Molly’s Game, Aaron Sorkin Who Should Win: The script for Logan by Scott Frank, James Mangold, and Michael Green brings us the emotional and character-driven Wolverine film we have all been waiting for.  

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The Big Sick

Best Original Screenplay:

The Big Sick, Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani
Get Out, Jordan Peele
Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig
The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Martin McDonagh 

Ari: Who will Win:  This is another close category.  Martin McDonagh has been receiving accolades for his script of Three Billboards and since he did not receive a directing nomination, this may be his conciliation prize. However, I would have to give the edge to Jordan Peele for his truly innovative and original script for Get Out. Who Should Win: The Big Sick was the best film that I saw this year.  Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani crafted a brilliant script out of the story of how they fell in love.

David: Who will Win: Get Out, Jordan Peele, this is an opportunity to give best the picture nominee Get Out an award.  Who Should Win:  Get Out, Jordan Peele or even The Big Sick, but certainly not Martin McDonagh clunky Billboards.

Eddie: Who will Win:  Get Out, Jordan Peele  Who Should Win: Toughest category of the night: Get Out couldn’t be more relevant, hilarious, frightening and eye-opening, but with Lady BirdGreta Gerwig redefined herself and spoke to the teenage girl living inside all of us.

Myrna: Who will Win: Get Out, Jordan Peele for a film that defines our time.
Who Should Win: The Big Sick, Emily V. Gordon, and Kumail Nanjiani for a film that defines our heart.

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Coco, The Boss Baby, Ferdinand, The Breadwinner, Loving Vincent

Best Animated Feature:

The Boss Baby
The Breadwinner
Coco
Ferdinand
Loving Vincent

Ari: Who will Win: Never bet against Pixar.  Coco for the win. Who Should Win: Loving Vincent was one of the most visually stunning films I have ever seen.  I would give it to that.

David: Who will and Should Win: Coco. The Breadwinner was a powerful and captivating work but I have to go with Coco.

Eddie: Who will Win & Should Win: Coco, because Pixar.

Myrna: Who will Win and Should Win: Coco, a joyous and stunning tribute to family and culture.

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Garden Par

Best Animated Short:

Dear Basketball
Garden Party
Lou
Negative Space
Revolting Rhyme

Ari: Who will Win: Even though it was the weakest of the shorts, it will probably go to Dear Basketball.  Everybody loves Kobe Bryant.  Who Should Win: Revolting Rhymes

David: Who will Win: Dear Basketball. The weakest of the group but the cool factor of Kobe Bryant winning, plus a score by John Williams may be too hard to resist for Academy voters. Who Should Win: Garden Party appealed to my darker taste but Revolting Rhymes might be the best of a strong group.

Myrna: I am sad to say I missed the shorts this year

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Mudbound

Best Cinematography:

Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

Ari: Who will Win:  The Shape of Water was tailor made for this category.  Welcome to the Winners Circle Dan Laustsen. Who Should Win: I was really taken with the photography of MudboundRachel Morrison really captured the feeling of a post WWII Mississippi farm.

David: Who will Win: Dan Laustsen, The Shape of Water  Who Should Win: Blade Runner 2049.

Eddie: Who will Win:  This will be the test to see how deep into The Shape of Water the Academy is. I think Dan Laustsen takes it for that visually sumptuous film. Who Should Win: I’m not mad at a The Shape of Water win, but did you see Blade Runner 2049? It was too beautiful to comprehend.

Myrna: Who will Win: Dan Laustsen for capturing the gritty beauty of fantastical film The Shape of Water   Who Should Win: The 14-time Oscar nominee Roger Deakins for the stunning Blade Runner 2049 and so many other films.

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Phantom Thread

Best Costume Design 

Beauty and the Beast
Darkest Hour
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Victoria & Abdul

Ari: Who will and should Win: Phantom Thread no contest.  Dresses in the style of Charles James? I am so on board.

David: Who will and should win: Phantom Thread

Eddie: Who will Win: I think this is where Phantom Thread picks up a win. It’s about clothes! (Well, not really.)  Who Should Win: Phantom Thread. 

Myrna: Who will Win and Who Should Win: Luis Sequeira for The Shape of Water. ‘Make it like a George Clooney of fish-men!’ – Guillermo del Toro

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Faces Places

 Best Documentary:

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail
Faces Places
Icarus
Last Man in Aleppo
Strong Island 

Ari: Who will Win: Faces Places was a lighter film with beautiful imagery. I think it will probably get the award.  Who Should Win: Yance Ford’s Strong Island was a brilliant depiction of injustice and racism in what is supposed to be a progressive place.

David: Who will and Should Win: Faces Places is unforgettable for finding the extraordinary beauty in ordinary people. It will be a treat to see Agnès Varda, the mother of the French New Wave win an Oscar.

Eddie: Who will Win: Faces Places  Who Should Win: Last Man in Aleppo

Myrna: A difficult category but Faces Places will and should win. I am still haunted by the beautiful imagery of this documentary.  

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Baby Driver

Best Film Editing:

Baby Driver
Dunkirk
I, Tonya
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Ari: Who will and should Win: Dunkirk. While it annoys me that Christopher Nolan always has to do something weird with time in his films, he does it brilliantly with the help of long-time collaborator Lee Smith.  Not to mention he was robbed of a nomination for Inception.

David: Who will Win: I have a feeling that Baby Driver may be the upset here however, usually the best editing winner is also the best picture winner. So, I’m going with Dunkirk—what? Who Should Win: Baby Driver

Eddie: Who will Win & Should Win: Dunkirk, although the editing of I, Tonya was practically another lead character.

Myrna: Who will Win: Dunkirk for its amazing layering of time.  Who Should Win: Baby Driver for being an action dance piece set to music.

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A Fantastic Woman, Chile

Best Foreign Language Film: 

A Fantastic Woman, Chile
The Insult, Lebanon
Loveless, Russia
On Body and Soul, Hungary
The Square, Sweden

Ari: Who will Win: A Fantastic Woman will probably resonate with Academy voters.  Who Should Win: The Square

David: Who will Win: A Fantastic Woman. Who Should Win: I only saw The Square in this category and I don’t feel this one is strong enough to win.

Eddie: Who will Win & Should Win: The Square. That’s what you get for putting Elisabeth Moss in your movie!

Myrna: Who will Win and Who Should Win: The Square, Sweden 

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Heaven Is A Traffic Jam on the 405

Best Documentary Short: 

Edith and Eddie
Heaven Is A Traffic Jam on the 405
Heroin(e)
Knife Skills
Traffic Stop

Ari: Who will Win: Netflix should pick up its second win in this category for Heroin(e).  Who Should Win: Heaven Is A Traffic Jam on the 405, even though I haven’t seen it, I would give it a win for the name.

David: Who will Win: word on the street (the web) is that this one will go to Heaven Is A Traffic Jam on the 405. 

Myrna: Who will Win: Heroin(e) Who Should Win: Knife Skills a powerful film about second chances.  

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Watu Wote/All of Us 

Best Live Action Short:

DeKalb Elementary
The Eleven O’Clock
My Nephew Emmett
The Silent Child
Watu Wote/All of Us 

Ari: Who will Win: DeKalb Elementary, unfortunately, became all too real two weeks ago at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.   Who Should Win: The Silent Child really brought you into the world of the deaf.

David: Who will Win: DeKalb Elementary is actually the weakest of the group, but I think the subject will resonate with voters. Who Should Win: The Silent Child.

Myrna: This is a hard category, I liked all the nominees but I believe My Nephew Emmett will win but it is  The Silent Child that should win for truly immersing us into the world of a deaf child.

Untitled design (19)
Wonder

Best Makeup and Hairstyling:

Darkest Hour
Victoria & Abdul
Wonder

Ari: Who will and should Win: Darkest Hour for putting Gary Oldman in a fat suit.

David: Who will and should win: Darkest HourGary Oldman’s transformation into Winston Churchill by David Malinkowski, Lucy Sibbick, Anita Burger was brilliant.

 

Eddie: Who will Win & Should Win: Darkest Hour. Don’t even talk to me about Wonder.

Myrna: Darkest Hour will win but I, Tonya should win. 

Untitled design (20)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Original Score: 

Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Ari: Who will Win: Alexandre Desplat has been pulling in all of the pre-Oscar awards.  I would expect him to take home the gold for The Shape of Water.  Who Should Win: Hans Zimmer did a truly incredible job with this work on Dunkirk.

David: Who will Win: The Shape of Water.  Who Should Win: This was a strong year for movie scores. I loved Jonny Greenwood’s score for Phantom Thread, it complements the lush visual textures of the film, but I have to go with Hans Zimmer’s score for Dunkirk, it was essential to the film.

Eddie: Who will & Should Win: Dunkirk because it’s the only score that defined the movie.

Myrna: Alexandre Desplat for The Shape of Water will win, deservedly so but the sonic wonder of Dunkirk could come in as an upset.  

Untitled design (17)
“This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman

Best Original Song: 

“Mighty River,” Mudbound
“Mystery of Love,” Call Me By Your Name
“Remember Me,” Coco
“Stand Up For Something,” Marshall
“This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman

Ari: Who will Win: “This Is Me” from The Greatest Showman since it is so hummable.   Who Should Win: “Remember Me” from Coco.  I have loved Kristin Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez since Avenue Q.

David: Who will Win: “Remember Me,” Coco.  Who Should Win: “Mystery of Love,” Call Me By Your Name.

Eddie: Who will Win:  “Remember Me” Coco. Who Should Win: I’m actually humming “This Is Me” right now.

Myrna: “This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman will win, the Academy loves a good anthem but it’s “Remember Me,”Coco that has my heart.

Untitled design (16)
The Shape of Water

Best Production Design: 

Beauty and the Beast
Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water

Ari: Who will and should Win: The Shape of Water was so visually stunning for both its cinematography and its production design.  This one should take home the prize.

David: Who will Win: The Shape of Water  Who Should Win: The Shape of Water

Eddie: Who will Win & Should Win: The production of The Shape of Water was almost too beautiful.

Myrna: The Shape of Water will win and should win. Guillermo del Toro’s and Paul Austerberry’s visual storytelling take us to a dreamy, romantic, fantastical world I never want to leave.

Untitled design (15)
Dunkirk

Best Sound Editing: 

Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Ari: Who will and should Win: Dunkirk¸ full stop.

David: Who will and Should Win: Dunkirk 

 

Eddie: Who will Win & Should Win:I couldn’t imagine a movie more deserving than Baby Driver… until I saw Dunkirk.

Myrna: Dunkirk will win but I am voting for Blade Runner 2049 and it’s wonderful use of silence.

Untitled design (14)
Baby Driver

Best Sound Mixing: 

Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Ari: Who will and should Win: See above

David: Who will Win:   Who Should Win:

Eddie: Who will Win & Should Win: Please see my above answer for film editing. Dunkirk.

Myrna: Dunkirk will win and it would be totally deserving but there was some special kind of magic going on in Baby Driver.

Untitled design (12)
Blade Runner 2049

Best Visual Effects:

Blade Runner 2049
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
Kong: Skull Island
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
War for the Planet of the Apes

Ari: Who will Win: I am going to go out on a limb and say Blade Runner 2049 will pick up this award, but I would not be surprised if War for the Planet of the Apes is victorious. Who Should Win: Blade Runner 2049

David: Who will Win: This one will go to the amazing motion capture performances of War for the Planet of the Apes. Who Should Win: I loved Blade Runner but I think the Apes have it.

Eddie: Who will Win:  The sheer number of below-the-line nominations Blade Runner 2049 has received shows The Academy’s appreciation for the technical marvel. This will be a category where that appreciation pays off.  Who Should Win: Is it crazy to say that sadly forgotten Kong: Skull Island?

Myrna: War for the Planet of the Apes the last film in the trilogy will win but it really belongs to Blade Runner 2049 with the Best Cinematography award for Roger Deakins.

 

The 90th Academy Awards will be announced on Sunday, March 4 on ABC. Join MoviefiedNYC for live streaming at @MoviefiedNYC

Throwback Thursday Oscar Edition: Who Should Have Won?

Carry and Oscar

The Academy Award is the most coveted award in the film industry.  When one receives this award, it translates to more parts, more fame, and bragging rights that for one year, “I was the best.”  Or not.  Since its inception, the Academy Awards have been known to be a bit of a popularity contest.  This is not to say that it doesn’t get it right sometimes (Vivien Leigh winning for Best Actress in Gone with the Wind, Schindler’s List winning Best Picture, etc.). However, the Oscar prognosticators spend time analyzing the awards and looking to see who the Academy deems the most popular for that year, but not necessarily the best.  There are classic Oscar missteps that have been addressed by many (see Shakespeare in Love winning for Best Picture instead of Saving Private Ryan or How Green was My Valley winning Best Picture over Citizen Kane).  For this Throwback Thursday, managing editor John David West and awards season guru Ariadne Ansbro look back at some of the lesser known Oscar mistakes and tell you who they think should have won.

 

1950 Best Actress
From top left: Judy Holliday in Born Yesterday, Bette Davis in All About Eve, and Gloria Swanson in Sunset Blvd.

1950 Best Actress

Judy Holliday, Born Yesterday

Anne Baxter, All About Eve

Bette Davis, All About Eve

Eleanor Parker, Caged

Gloria Swanson, Sunset Blvd.

Ari’s pick: This is a tough one for me.  Judy Holliday was excellent at playing the dizzy blond Billie Dawn who starts to receive an education in Born Yesterday, but she was not even in the same league as Bette Davis or Gloria Swanson. Pitting Davis and Swanson against each other in career defining roles is an almost impossible choice.  However, I am paid to make impossible choices, so I would have to say that the winner that year should have been Bette Davis.  Her performance in All About Eve was the stuff of legends.  Can you imagine anyone else saying, “Fasten your seatbelts.  It’s going to be a bumpy night.”?

David’s pick: Judy Holliday?  Holliday is solid as Billie Dawn, the same role she played on Broadway, but let’s have a reality check here: Bette Davis in All About Eve and Gloria Swanson in Sunset Blvd. Choosing between those two is unfair (like Meryl Streep and Jessica Lange in 1982)—and that’s probably why Holliday won. They cancelled each other out. Since life is unfair, I’m going to make a choice and say that the 1950 Best Actress should have gone to Gloria Swanson for her larger than life performance in Sunset Blvd. Her movie icon status was solidified when she said, “All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.”

 

1959 Best Actor
Charlton Heston in Ben-Hur and Jack Lemmon in Some Like it Hot

1959 Best Actor

Charlton Heston, Ben-Hur

Jack Lemmon, Some Like it Hot

James Stewart, Anatomy of a Murder

Laurence Harvey, Room at the Top

Paul Muni, The Last Angry Man

Ari’s pick: I am going to start by saying one of the most unpopular things I could ever say: I don’t like Ben-Hur.  This does not mean that I cannot see past my dislike for a film, yet see the brilliance in a performance (i.e. Peter O’Toole in Lawrence of Arabia, don’t hate me).  However, Charlton Heston played Charlton Heston.  He was the exact same tough guy that he played in every movie before, and all of the Bible epics he did after.  Laurence Harvey was wonderful in Room at the Top.  I generally think that Harvey is an actor who is largely forgotten about, mostly due to his untimely death at age 45.  James Stewart really played against type in Anatomy of a Murder as a slightly dubious defense attorney who defends a man accused of murder.  In the end, I have to go with Jack Lemmon in Some Like it Hot.  There are so many great things in this film, but Lemmon is a true stand out.  Sadly, Oscar is not big on honoring comedic performances.  

David’s pick: I have to confess, I’m not familiar with many in this category and not a fan of the tediously long Ben-Hur. My choice is Jack Lemmon in Some Like it Hot for his comic performance as a musician who is forced to dress as a woman in order to hide from the mob. It’s a solid iconic comic performance in one of cinemas great classic comedies. 

 

 

1962 Best Actress
Patty Duke in The Miracle Worker and Angela Lansbury in The Manchurian Candidate

1962 Best Supporting Actress

Patty Duke, The Miracle Worker

Angela Lansbury, The Manchurian Candidate

Mary Badham, To Kill a Mockingbird

Shirley Knight, Sweet Bird of Youth

Thelma Ritter, Birdman of Alcatraz

Ari’s pick: Patty Duke won an Oscar for her role as Helen Keller in The Miracle Worker.  This film was poised to pick up acting Oscars for both Duke and Anne Bancroft in the lead actress category, as the Oscars love to reward people for playing real people and characters who must overcome some sort of physical or mental disability (check and check).  The problem is that years later, the performance that stands out the most in this category is Angela Lansbury in The Manchurian Candidate.  These days it is hard to think of Lansbury playing someone so diabolical.  Lansbury’s performance is so memorable that AFI named her portrayal of Mrs. John Iselin as one of the 50 best villains of all time.  

David’s pick: Of all the fine supporting performances in 1962, it’s Angela Lansbury in The Manchurian Candidate, who should have won for her performance as the cold and calculating, communist agent who is part of a plot to brainwash her son to commit murder. Yes, that’s right, our beloved Jessica Fletcher from Murder She Wrote played an evil communist operative. It’s an unforgettable performance that still holds up today. It’s a damn shame that Lansbury was overlooked for her most deserving Oscar.

 

1985 Best Actress
Geraldine Page in A Trip to Bountiful and Whoppi Goldberg in The Color Purple

 

1985 Best Actress

Geraldine Page, A Trip to Bountiful

Anne Bancroft, Agnes of God

Jessica Lange, Sweet Dreams

Meryl Streep, Out of Africa

Whoopi Goldberg, The Color Purple

Ari’s pick: Over the years, the Academy has given out awards to actors for their body of work instead of their individual performance in the film for which they are nominated.  For example, Henry Fonda for On Golden Pond and Jeff Bridges in Crazy Heart.  Both are fine performances, but no one would say that those were necessarily the “best” performances of their careers.  Geraldine Page’s win in 1985 is much the same.  She had been nominated seven times prior to this win and, as it turned out, didn’t have much longer to live (she died in 1987).  So the Academy felt that it was her time.  I don’t.  Whoopi Goldberg should have won for The Color Purple.   She was perfect as a woman trapped due to her circumstance, who eventually learns to find her voice.  The Color Purple was nominated for 11 Oscars, and didn’t win any.  What a shame.

David’s pick: This is a tough one for me because I’m pretty happy with Geraldine Page, but I have to admit that her Best Actress win does kind of feel like a lifetime achievement award. Streep and Lange are fantastic, and I was almost ready to go with Lange as Patsy Cline. But I have to go with Whoopi Goldberg for her breakout performance in The Color Purple. She was the most authentic and heartbreaking thing in a film that tended to be a bit stagy, over the top, and even silly; Goldberg kept it real.

 

 

1993 Best Sup Actor
Tommy Lee Jones in The Fugitive and Ralph Fiennes in Schindler’s List

1993 Best Supporting Actor

Tommy Lee Jones, The Fugitive

Leonardo DiCaprio, What’s Eating Gilbert Grape?

Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List

John Malkovich, In the Line of Fire

Pete Postlethwaite, In the Name of the Father

Ari’s pick: This is a great category.  Each of these performances were so intricate and mesmerizing that they are all memorable.  However, there was one that was better than all the rest: Ralph Fiennes in Schindler’s List.  In life, most people are not all good or all evil; everyone has nuance.  Fiennes plays Amon Goeth as an evil, conniving, murderous bastard, but he also shows a human side to him.  Fiennes was asked about how he could play Goeth as a human being and not as a mustache twirling villain.  He said, “I mean, I could make a judgment myself privately, this is a terrible, evil, horrific man. But the job was to portray the man, the human being. There’s a sort of banality, that everydayness, that I think was important.”  The best scene that illustrates this is when he attempts to show a human side and does not immediately punish a Jewish worker for not getting the stains off his bathtub.  Watch it here.

David’s pick: 1993 was a great year at the Oscar, and this category is a difficult one. There’s not one clunker here. But Tommy Lee Jones Oscar for The Fugitive feels like he won for one of those big performances that inspires Academy voters to award more for career achievement than a specific performance. Without a doubt the Oscar should have gone to Ralph Fiennes in Schindler’s List as Amon Goeth, a Nazi concentration camp commandant. His portrayal of Amon was not just a two-dimensional evil Nazi that’s a pleasure to hate, but rather he played him with depth and complexity, which adds a level of tension and intensity.

Movie-Still Monday (on Tuesday) Oscar Edition: Lesley Manville

Another Year
Lesley Manville in Another Year (2010)

Lesley Manville received her first Oscar nomination for Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread playing the sister and business partner of fashion designer Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis, who also received a nomination).  Manville has been active in mostly British films and television since the 1970s.  She is a favorite of director Mike Leigh appearing in Secrets and Lies (1996), Topsy Turvy (1999), Vera Drake (2004), and Mr. Turner (2014) to name a few.  In Leigh’s Another Year (2010), Manville plays Mary, the desperate woman of a certain age who is both pitied by and annoying to her friends.

Movie-Still Monday Oscar Edition: Saoirse Ronan

 

Atonement
Saoirse Ronan (with James McAvoy) in Atonement (2007)

We begin our celebration of Oscar season by celebrating the previous films of this year’s nominees.  Saoirse Ronan is celebrating her third nomination this year for her performance in Lady Bird.  Ronan is the second youngest woman (behind Jennifer Lawrence) to receive three nominations.  Ronan received her first nomination at age 13 for her role as the little girl you love to hate in Atonement (2007).

 

The 2018 Oscar Nominations are in!

Statuettes

They’re heeeeeeeeeere!  That’s right, the Oscar nominations have come in.  As usual, there were some surprises and some snubs that I may never forgive.  Obviously, I have a masochistic relationship with the Oscars.

Shape of Water 2
The Shape of Water

The Shape of Water received 13 nominations including Best Picture, Best Director (Guillermo del Toro), Best Actress (Sally Hawkins), Best Supporting Actor (Richard Jenkins), and Best Supporting Actress (Octavia Spencer).  This was followed by the wartime drama Dunkirk with eight nominations.  Dunkirk received nominations in mostly technical categories, but it did receive nominations for Best Picture and Best Director (Christopher Nolan).  SAG Awards darling Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri followed with seven nominations.  As predicted, Three Billboards received nominations for Best Actress (Frances McDormand), Best Supporting Actor (Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson), and Best Picture.

Peele - Get Out
Jordan Peele directing Get Out

After being snubbed at the Golden Globes, both Jordan Peele and Greta Gerwig were nominated in the Best Director category for their work on Get Out and Lady Bird, respectively. They also both received nominations in the Best Original Screenplay category. Gerwig is only the fifth woman to ever be nominated in this category, and the first woman nominated in eight years.  Lady Bird made out pretty well, scoring nominations for Best Picture, Best Actress (Saoirse Ronan), and Best Supporting Actress (Laurie Metcalf).  Similarly, Get Out was nominated for Best Picture and Best Actor (Danial Kaluuya).

Hanks - Post
Tom Hanks in The Post

Even though he received nominations for a Golden Globe and a SAG Award, I was not expecting to see Denzel Washington amongst the nominees for his work in Roman J. Israel, Esq.  This is his eighth acting nomination and ninth career nomination (he received a nomination as a producer on last year’s Fences).  Roman J. Israel, Esq. hit theaters back in November with little to no fanfare.  The film itself received middling reviews scoring only 49% on Rotten Tomatoes.  While I adore Denzel, I was rather disappointed that Tom Hanks wasn’t nominated.  His work in The Post was well crafted, and definitely worthy of a nomination.  The other surprise in the Best Actor category was the omission of James Franco for his work in The Disaster Artist.  A nomination for Franco’s portrayal of The Room actor/director/producer Tommy Wiseau was widely considered a lock until the Golden Globes.  After winning the award for Best Actor in a Musical/Comedy, he was accused of sexual misconduct by several women who worked with him at his acting school.  The nominations were accepted through January 19, so I would guess that it significantly hurt his chances of receiving a second nomination.

Manville - Thread
Lesley Manville in Phantom Thread

The omission of Holly Hunter in the Best Supporting Actress category astonishes me.  She was divine in The Big Sick as the mother of a young woman in a coma attempting to bond with her daughter’s ex-boyfriend.  On the plus side, The Big Sick did receive a nomination for Best Original Screenplay.  For those of you who are unaware, the film is based on the real life romance of writers Kumail Nanjiani (who also starred in the film) and his wife, Emily V. Gordon.  Octavia Spencer’s nomination did not seem to be earned to me.  In The Shape of Water, she played a very similar character to the one she played in last year’s Hidden Figures.  Since she received a nomination for that film as well, I would guess that it is a formula that works for her.  British actress Lesley Manville surprised everyone by slipping into the Best Supporting Actress category for her role as the sister and business partner of couturier Reynolds Woodcock (fellow nominee Daniel Day-Lewis) in The Phantom Thread.  Her inclusion in this category kicked out Downsizing’s Hong Chau.

Also, KOBE BRYANT RECEIVED A NOMINATION! His animated short film Dear Basketball was nominated.  Wow, just wow.

The 90th Academy Awards, hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, will be presented on March 4, 2018 on ABC.

-Ariadne Ansbro

 

Full List of Nominees:

Get Out 3
Get Out

BEST PICTURE
Call Me By Your Name
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Post
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Washington - Israel
Denzel Washington in Roman J. Israel, Esq.

BEST ACTOR
Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out
Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
Denzel Washington, Roman J. Israel, Esq.

I Tonya
Margot Robbie in I, Tonya

BEST ACTRESS
Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird
Meryl Streep, The Post

Gerwig - Lady Bird
Greta Gerwig directing Lady Bird

BEST DIRECTOR
Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan
Get Out, Jordan Peele
Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig
Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson
The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro

Spencer - Shape
Octavia Spencer in The Shape of Water

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
Allison Janney, I, Tonya
Lesley Manville, Phantom Thread
Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird
Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water

Jenkins - Shape
Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer, All the Money in the World
Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Logan
Logan

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Call Me By Your Name, James Ivory
The Disaster Artist, Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber
Logan, Scott Frank, James Mangold, Michael Green
Molly’s Game, Aaron Sorkin
Mudbound, Virgil Williams and Dee Rees

The Big Sick
The Big Sick

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
The Big Sick, Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani
Get Out, Jordan Peele
Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig
The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Martin McDonagh

Dunkirk
Dunkirk

PRODUCTION DESIGN
Beauty and the Beast
Blade Runner 2049

Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water

Mudbound
Mudbound

CINEMATOGRAPHY
Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

Phantom Thread
Phantom Thread

COSTUME DESIGN
Beauty and the Beast
Darkest Hour
Phantom Thread

The Shape of Water
Victoria & Abdul

Blade Runner 2049
Blade Runner 2049

SOUND EDITING
Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049

Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Baby Driver 2
Baby Driver

SOUND MIXING
Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Shape of Water
The Shape of Water

ORIGINAL SCORE
Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Kong
Kong: Skull Island

VISUAL EFFECTS
Blade Runner 2049
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
Kong: Skull Island
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
War for the Planet of the Apes

Three Billboards
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

FILM EDITING
Baby Driver
Dunkirk
I, Tonya
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Dench - Victoria
Victoria & Abdul

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
Darkest Hour
Victoria & Abdul

Wonder

The Insult
The Insult

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
A Fantastic Woman, Chile
The Insult, Lebanon
Loveless, Russia
On Body and Soul, Hungary
The Square, Sweden

Marshell
Marshall

ORIGINAL SONG
“Mighty River,” Mudbound
“Mystery of Love,” Call Me By Your Name
“Remember Me,” Coco
“Stand Up For Something,” Marshall
“This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman

Loving Vincent
Loving Vincent

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
The Boss Baby
The Breadwinner
Coco
Ferdinand
Loving Vincent

Last Man
Last Man in Aleppo

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Abacus: Small Enough to Jail
Faces Places
Icarus
Last Man in Aleppo
Strong Island

Dear Basketball
Dear Basketball

ANIMATED SHORT FILM
Dear Basketball
Garden Party
Lou
Negative Space
Revolting Rhymes

My Nephew
My Nephew Emmett

LIVE-ACTION SHORT FILM
DeKalb Elementary
The Eleven O’Clock
My Nephew Emmett
The Silent Child
Watu Wote/All of Us

 

Edith and Eddie
Edith and Eddie

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
Edith and Eddie
Heaven Is A Traffic Jam on the 405
Heroin(e)
Knife Skills
Traffic Stop

 

Oscars 2017: La La Land, I mean, Moonlight wins Best Picture!

oscar-stage

Holy shit!  What the hell just happened?!?! In a surprise twist, Moonlight took home the Oscar for Best Picture, beating the powerhouse that was La La Land, going into the 89th Academy Awards. If that wasn’t surprise enough, the way Moonlight was revealed to be the Best Picture is the real story.  Bonnie and Clyde costars Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway were on hand to announce the biggest award of the night: Best Picture.  Beatty opens the envelope, stares at the card, looks back in the now empty envelope, Dunaway gently chides Beatty for dragging out the announcement, she takes the card, and announces that La La Land is the winner.  The cast and crew of La La Land file on stage to accept the award and make speeches.  All of a sudden there is a commotion on stage and Land producer Jordan Horowitz says that Moonlight won Best Picture.  From my own personal stand point, I thought this was a kind of “What a lovely film, we share this award with you” kind of statement.  However, it soon became clear that Warren Beatty had been given the Best Actress envelope instead of the Best Picture envelope.  Oops!  Something tells me Pricewaterhouse Cooper may not be contracted for this job next year…

best-picture
Jordan Horowitz shows the crowd that Moonlight won Best Picture

The sadness of the situation comes from the fact that neither La La Land nor Moonlight really got to have their moment.  I am sure it was slightly devastating and embarrassing for the cast and crew of La La Land to be told that they did not, in fact, win the award that they were holding.  However, even though everyone was pleasantly surprised for Moonlight, their moment was overshadowed by the gaffe.  On the bright side, at least it wasn’t another streaker at the Oscars.

in-memoriam
Jan Chapman’s photo next to Janet Patterson’s name (Patterson in the inset)

The other gaffe of the night was not quite as obvious to those of us watching at home.  During the In Memoriam section of the awards, four-time Oscar nominated costume designer Janet Patterson was remembered.  However, the photograph that was shown was that of Australian producer Jan Chapman.  As it turns out, Getty Images, the company who provided the images for the segment mislabeled a photograph of Chapman as Patterson.  Chapman later told the press, “I was devastated by the use of my image in place of my great friend and long-time collaborator Janet Patterson. I had urged her agency to check any photograph which might be used and understand that they were told that the Academy had it covered.” Oops number two.

The evening was not a complete blunder.  Even though it did not win Best Picture La La Land received six awards, more than any other film this year, including Best Director (Damien Chazelle), Best Actress (Emma Stone), Best Original Song (“City of Stars”), and Best Original Score. Moonlight picked up three awards for Best Picture (I think…), Best Supporting Actor (Mahershala Ali), and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Casey Affleck was awarded Best Actor for his quietly effecting performance in Manchester by the SeaSea also won the award for Best Original Screenplay for writer/director Kenneth Lonergan. While Affleck was the frontrunner for most of the award season, his inevitable win came into question when information regarding a sexual harassment accusation from 2010 was released.  Several industry professionals were vocal about not allowing Affleck to win the award.  Regardless, he pulled through.

davis-oscars-2
Viola Davis accepts her Oscar from Mark Rylance

After three nominations, Viola Davis picked up her first Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in Fences.  Davis was visibly moved during her acceptance speech which was, arguably, the best of the night.  “You know, there is one place that all the people with the greatest potential are gathered and that’s the graveyard. People ask me all the time — what kind of stories do you want to tell, Viola? And I say exhume those bodies. Exhume those stories — the stories of the people who dreamed big and never saw those dreams to fruition, people who fell in love and lost. I became an artist and thank God I did,” she continued “because we are the only profession that celebrates what it means to live a life.” Host Jimmy Kimmel was not kidding when he said she would win an Emmy for that acceptance speech.

 

moana-song
Auli’i Cravalho sings “How Far I’ll Go” from Moana

I realize that I may be in the minority, but I was thoroughly underwhelmed by Kimmel’s performance.  While his low-key, lackluster delivery works for his late night talk show, it did not translate well to the Oscars.  The opening monologue was unmemorable, with the exception of the standing ovation he requested for “overrated” actress Meryl Streep.  At one point, Kimmel pranked a group of tourists on a sightseeing bus tour by taking them into the theater and allowing them to interact with the first row of celebrities.  Initially, their reactions were sweet, but it eventually fell flat and just dragged on for far too long.  Even the Mean Tweets (which I normally LOVE) were pretty unfunny.  The only semi-funny part of the show was the ongoing feud between Matt Damon and Kimmel.  I guess Kimmel really does aspire to be like David Letterman.  After all, he two hosted a very unfunny Oscar telecast.

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Real life NASA mathmatician Katherine Johnson

Other noteable moments:

 

  • The subject of Hidden Figures, Katherine Johnson appears on stage with the cast of the film.
  • Lin-Manuel Miranda performs a prologue to his nominated song, “How Far I’ll Go” from Moana.  Auli’i Cravalho performs the song beautifully, even though she gets hit by a flag midway through the song.  What a pro.
  • The Salesman wins Best Foreign Language Film.  Iranian director Asghar Farhadi sends American engineer Anousheh Ansari to accept the award on his behalf.  Ansari reads Farhadi’s statement: “My absence is out of respect for people of my country and those of other six nations whom have been disrespected by the inhumane law that bans entry of immigrants to the US. Dividing the world into the US and the enemy creates fear; a deceitful justification for regression and war. Filmmakers can turn their cameras to capture shared human qualities and break stereotypes of various nationalities and religions; they create empathy between us and others. An empathy we need today more than ever.”
  • Stars sport blue ribbons to support the American Civil Liberies Union (ACLU).
  • Charlize Theron presents with inspiration Shirley MacLaine and Seth Rogan presents with inspiration Michael J. Fox.  Rogan proceeds to sing part of Hamilton.

-Ariadne Ansbro

The full list of winners is below:

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Mahershala Ali

Best supporting actor

WINNER: Mahershala Ali (Moonlight)
Jeff Bridges (Hell or High Water)
Lucas Hedges (Manchester by the Sea)
Dev Patel (Lion)
Michael Shannon (Nocturnal Animals)

Best makeup and hairstyling

A Man Called Ove
Star Trek Beyond
WINNER: Suicide Squad

Best costume design

Allied
WINNER: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Florence Foster Jenkins
Jackie
La La Land

Best documentary

Fire at Sea
I Am Not Your Negro
Life, Animated
WINNER: OJ: Made in America
13th

Best sound editing

WINNER: Arrival
Deepwater Horizon
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land
Sully

Best sound mixing

Arrival
WINNER: Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
13 Hours

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Viola Davis

Best supporting actress

WINNER: Viola Davis (Fences)
Naomie Harris (Moonlight)
Nicole Kidman (Lion)
Octavia Spencer (Hidden Figures)
Michelle Williams (Manchester by the Sea)

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American engineer Anousheh Ansari reads statement from Asghar Farhadi

Best foreign language film

Land of Mine
A Man Called Ove
WINNER: The Salesman
Tanna
Toni Erdmann

Best animated short

Blind Vaysha
Borrowed Time
Pear Cider and Cigarettes
Pearl
WINNER: Piper

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Producers of Zootopia celebrate their win

Best animated feature

Kubo and the Two Strings
Moana
My Life As a Zucchini
The Red Turtle
WINNER: Zootopia

Best production design

Arrival
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Hail, Caesar!
WINNER: La La Land
Passengers

Best visual effects

Deepwater Horizon
Doctor Strange
WINNER: The Jungle Book
Kubo and the Two Strings
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Best film editing

Arrival
WINNER: Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
La La Land
Moonlight

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Producers of The White Helmets pay homage to those in war-torn Syria

Best documentary short

4.1 Miles
Extremis
Joe’s Violin
Watani: My Homeland
WINNER: The White Helmets

Best live-action short

Ennemis Interieurs
La Femme et le TGV
Silent Nights
WINNER: Sing
Timecode

Best cinematography

Arrival
WINNER: La La Land
Lion
Moonlight
Silence

Best score

Jackie
WINNER: La La Land
Lion
Moonlight
Passengers

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John Legend performs “City of Stars” and “Audition” from La La Land

Best song

Audition (La La Land)
Can’t Stop the Feeling! (Trolls)
WINNER: City of Stars (La La Land)
The Empty Chair (Jim: The James Foley Story)
How Far I’ll Go (Moana)

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Kenneth Lonergan wins Best Original Screenplay for Manchester by the Sea

Best original screenplay

Hell or High Water
La La Land
The Lobster
WINNER: Manchester by the Sea
20th Century Women

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Best Adapted Screenplay winners Tarell Alvin McCraney and Barry Jenkins for Moonlight

Best adapted screenplay

Arrival
Fences
Hidden Figures
Lion
WINNER: Moonlight

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Damien Chazelle

Best director

Denis Villeneuve (Arrival)
Mel Gibson (Hacksaw Ridge)
WINNER: Damien Chazelle (La La Land)
Kenneth Lonergan (Manchester by the Sea)
Barry Jenkins (Moonlight)

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Casey Affleck

Best actor

WINNER: Casey Affleck (Manchester by the Sea)
Andrew Garfield (Hacksaw Ridge)
Ryan Gosling (La La Land)
Viggo Mortensen (Captain Fantastic)
Denzel Washington (Fences)

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Emma Stone

Best actress

Isabelle Huppert (Elle)
Ruth Negga (Loving)
WINNER: Emma Stone (La La Land)
Natalie Portman (Jackie)
Meryl Streep (Florence Foster Jenkins)

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Moonlight wins Best Picture

Best picture

Arrival
Fences
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
Hidden Figures
WINNER: La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
WINNER: Moonlight