Our Top 5 Latinx Films at 2017 Tribeca Film Festival

The 16th Annual Tribeca Film Festival, set for April 19-30, is taking over lower Manhattan for another year of quality filmmaking, groundbreaking new digital storytelling, and some of Hollywood’s biggest names. With a power roster that includes over 200 films playing from 28 countries, 78 of which are world premieres, six international, six North American, two U.S., and six New York premieres, you might need some help figuring out what to watch.  MoviefiedNYC is here with our Top Five Latinx picks that include: a documentary on what ever happened to Elián González (an Alex Gibney joint); a narrative film about the journey of a boxer from the Dominican Republic (this is the first time the D.R . has a selection at the festival); a movie about an Argentinian actor trying to make it in NYC; and finally an online feature about  one of oldest civil wars that’s still going strong.  

Check them out below and make sure to click on the link for showtimes.

ELIÁN – Spotlight Documentary
Directed by Tim Golden, Ross McDonnell. (Northern Ireland, Ireland, USA) – World Premiere.

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Thanksgiving, 1999: Two fishermen on the Florida Straits find a young Cuban boy, Elián González, floating alone in an inner tube. Their discovery evolves into a custody battle between Elián’s Cuban father and his Miami-located relatives that brings the conflict between Cuba and the U.S. to the forefront. Eighteen years later, ELIÁN, executive produced by Alex Gibney, gives the now grown-up Elián the chance to tell his own side of the story. In English, Spanish with subtitles.

Sambá – International Narrative Competition
Directed by Laura Amelia Guzmán and Israel Cárdenas, written by Ettore D’Alessandro, Carolina Encarnacion. (Dominican Republic) – World Premiere.

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Cisco has his back against the ropes. After spending 15 years in an American jail, he’s returned to the Dominican Republic yet is unable to get a job, a problem compounded by his mother’s ailing health and his younger brother’s delinquent habits. To make money, he’s resorted to illegal street fighting. But Cisco finds a possible salvation in Nichi, an Italian ex-boxer who sees dollar signs in Cisco’s gritty fighting skills. With Algenis Pérez Soto, Ettore D’Alessandro, Laura Gómez, Ricardo A. Toribio. In Spanish with
subtitles.

Nobody’s Watching (Nadie Nos Mira) – International Narrative Competition
Directed by Julia Solomonoff, written by Julia Solomonoff, Christina Lazaridi. (Colombia, Argentina, Brazil, USA, Spain) – World Premiere.

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After giving up a successful soap opera career in his native Argentina for a chance to make it in New York, Nico finds himself staying afloat with odd jobs bartending and babysitting. In a moving depiction of the vibrant city, Nobody’s Watching questions who is watching and how we adjust ourselves accordingly. With Guillermo Pfening, Rafael Ferro, Paola Baldion, Elena Roger, Cristina Morrison, Kerri Sohn, Marco Antonio Caponi. In English, Spanish with subtitles.

The Holdouts – N.O.W. (New Online Work)
Directed by Ramon Campos Iriarte (Colombia) – World Premiere.

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The Western hemisphere’s oldest civil war is still going strong in the jungles of Colombia. The National Liberation Army (ELN) —a Marxist military organization— has been fighting for revolution since 1964, and with the FARC having declared a ceasefire, the ELN is today the last active guerrilla army in the Americas. In Spanish, English with subtitles.

A River Below – Documentary Competition
Directed by Mark Grieco. (Colombia, USA) – World Premiere.

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Deep in the Amazon, a renowned marine biologist and a reality TV star are each working to save the indigenous pink river dolphin from being hunted to extinction. When a scandal erupts, ethical questions are raised as murky as the waters of the Amazon River. Mark Grieco’s (Marmato) surprising documentary digs into the ethics of activism in the modern media age. In English, Portuguese, Spanish with subtitles. Earth Day Screening.

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Tribeca Review: Match

Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard star in Match, the Tony-nominated -play- turned-feature-film, written and directed by Stephen Belber. The film tells the tale of a married couple who travel to New York to interview a choreographer for a dissertation on dance. Seeing as the story was set for the stage, a greater part of the story takes place within the confines of Tobi’s apartment, but Belber makes it work on film, with an outstanding cast and some intimate close-ups.

The story opens to a socially awkward and insanely charming Patrick Stewart as Tobi, an accomplished dancer who has turned to teaching at one of New York’s most prestigious dance schools. Right from the start, we know Tobi is not just any man; he is fantastically honest, quirky, charming, and downright adorable. He is clearly thrilled at having been asked to be interviewed; he nervously prepares for his guest by requesting party mix “to nibble on” at his local diner.

Soon, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard arrive as the polar-opposite married couple; she is sweet and warm, while he plays hard and cool. The plot soon progresses as Tobi tries and fails to make his long story short and discusses his years in the dancing community. However, it appears that all is not what it seems when the couple begins to grill him continually on a particular part of his past.

Deep resentment, polite laughs, and outrageous tales are shared between these apparent strangers, and Belber digs in to investigate human behavior in all its awkwardness. The eccentricities of people’s character, the importance we place on certain relationships, and the dismissive nature we have towards one another are all on the table in this quiet comedy-drama. The small and impressive cast investigates all the highs and lows of human behavior with beautiful subtlety. Our failed attempts at reading body language, the impressions we can leave on people with only a single action, and the way the physical world may not change, however, just one day can transform a person.


—Sinann Fetherston (B)


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2014 Tribeca Film Festival Daily Movie Still: Palo Alto

In honor of the 13th Annual Tribeca Film Festival MoviefiedNYC brings you a daily movie still from a festival film that catches our eye. Be sure to click on the title of the film to learn more about it.
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Emma Roberts in Palo Alto

Palo Alto: Gia Coppola’s debut feature establishes her as a stunning new talent, deftly capturing the complicated ties, heightened emotions, and romantic highs and lows of adolescence. Based on James Franco’s “Palo Alto: Stories”, several stories intertwine as the film unfolds. Emma Roberts plays April, a levelheaded, intelligent, and spirited young woman who finds herself attracted to introspective artist Teddy (Jack Kilmer), whose buddy Fred’s (Nat Wolff) destructive nihilism brings Teddy down with him. When her soccer coach (James Franco) comes onto her, April’s world begins to spiral out of her control. One party bleeds into another as April and Teddy finally acknowledge their mutual affection, and Fred’s escalating recklessness spirals into chaos.
With the vast majority of the film taking place outside of high school halls and classrooms, the characters are imbued with depth, as their carefully crafted lives are reflected in their dress, their bedrooms, and their actions. Coppola brings finesse to her storytelling with music, color, and style, making Palo Alto ring true with the genuine subtleties that capture high school life.

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2014 Tribeca Film Festival Daily Movie Still:The Kidnapping of Michel Houellebecq

In honor of the 13th Annual Tribeca Film Festival MoviefiedNYC brings you a daily movie still from a festival film that catches our eye. Be sure to click on the title of the film to learn more about it.

Michel Houellebecq in The Kidnapping of Michel Houellebecq
The Kidnapping of Michel Houellebecq: When the best selling and famously reclusive novelist Michel Houllebecq disappeared during his book tour in 2011, the rumors that spread regarding his whereabouts ran the gamut from suicide to, as the title suggests, a kidnapping. So endless was the speculation that we now have a perfectly perplexing film about it. Partly based on real-life events and starring Houellebecq himself, this fascinating and, despite its ominous-sounding title, wildly funny film blurs the line between fiction and documentary. Whatever the real truth may be, what we do know is that director Guillaume Nicloux has created a highly entertaining and farcical piece of cinema that echoes the dry tone and tongue-in-cheek presentation of its unique and ever-unconventional subject.


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2014 Tribeca Film Festival Daily Movie Still: City Limits

In honor of the 13th Annual Tribeca Film Festival MoviefiedNYC brings you a daily movie still from a festival film that catches our eye. Be sure to click on the title of the film to learn more about it.

This year our New York Shorts program “gets real” with four world premiere documentaries relatable to anyone who calls this city home.

City Limits: My Depression: The Up and Down and Up of It is an animated adaptation of the award winning Book, “My Depression, A Picture Book” with the voices of Sigourney Weaver, Steve Buscemi, and Fred Armisen. 70 Hester Street is about the former synagogue/whiskey still/raincoat factory the filmmaker grew up in on the Lower East Side of Manhattan and how he wants to remember it. Told almost entirely through voice mail messages, One Year Lease documents the travails of Brian, Thomas and Casper as they endure a year-long apartment lease with Rita, the cat-loving landlady. Set against the backdrop of the Arab-Israeli conflict and tensions between Jewish and Muslim college students, Of Many tells the story of the relationship between an Orthodox Rabbi and Imam.

Shorts Program Includes:
My Depression: The Up and Down and Up of It
70 Hester Street
One Year Lease
Of Many

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2014 Tribeca Film Festival Daily Movie Still: Bad Hair

In honor of the 13th Annual Tribeca Film Festival MoviefiedNYC brings you a daily movie still from a festival film that catches our eye. Be sure to click on the title of the film to learn more about it.

Samuel Lange in Bad Hair
Bad Hair: Junior is a precocious nine-year-old boy living in the housing projects of Caracas who wants nothing more than to straighten his head of tight curls for his yearbook photo. A desire that borders on obsession, it stirs homophobic panic in his mother, Marta, who is overtaxed from losing her husband, raising two children, and attempting to find a job. As she sharply recoils at Junior’s self-expression and abrasively acts to correct his behavior, Junior manages to find acceptance (and straight hair) in the company of his loving grandmother. From Venezuelan writer-director Mariana Rondon and featuring newcomer Samuel Lange in a beautifully standout performance, Bad Hair is a painfully tender coming-of-age drama about a boy caught in a maelstrom of identity and intolerance.

2014 Tribeca Film Festival Daily Movie Still: X/Y

In honor of the 13th Annual Tribeca Film Festival MoviefiedNYC brings you a daily movie still from a festival film that catches our eye. Be sure to click on the title of the film to learn more about it.

America Ferrera in X/Y
X/Y: In his sophomore feature, Ryan Piers Williams stars alongside America Ferrara, Melanie Diaz and Jon Paul Phillips in the character-driven drama centered around four friends living in New York and their interactions with one another as they search for a sense of balance. Mark, Jen, Sylvia and Jake are each caught in an emotionally arrested state of being and their individual attempts to escape it explores the murky web of communication and the stark detours we take to avoid confronting our own vulnerabilities. With raw energy, Williams puts a microscope on the wanton desire we all have to connect with someone, the desperate lengths we’ll go to keep that connection, and what happens to us when that connection no longer holds meaning. Sharp and honest performances from the ensemble round out this taut relationship drama.
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