1984: A Blockbuster Year

“My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today that I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.” Ronald Reagan brought that oops moment to the world as he tested a microphone before a radio address; later that November Regan won a landslide re-election. That was the peak of the Reagan era. That was 1984.

1984 was, indeed, an unforgettable year!Mary Lou Retton won gymnastic gold and American hearts at the L.A. Olympics. The reining Miss America, Vanessa Williams, was stripped of her title because of a nude photo spread in Penthouse magazine. Madonna became everyone’s “boy toy” with her “Like a Virgin” performance at the MTV Video Music Awards. Marvin Gaye was killed by his father; Bernie Goetz gunned down four muggers in the NYC subway; millions starved in Ethiopia; and Bob Geldoff responded with “Do They Know it’s Christmas Time.” Thousands died in the Union Carbide Corporation disaster in Bhopal, India; and Clara Peller asked, “Where’s the Beef?” Cindy Lauper proclaimed that “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”; Prince let us know what it sounds like “When Doves Cry”; and Tina Turner made a big comeback and asked, “What’s Love Got To Do With It?

Clearly, 1984 was a year of big news, big events, and, thanks to the number one TV show, Dynasty, really of big shoulder pads! But as the ashes of have long since settled, it’s ’84’s hit movies that remain with us and have stood the test of time.

Besides being the year that introduced the first PG-13 movie, (Red Dawn), 1984 was the birth year for a number of hit features that spawned numerous sequels: The Terminator, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Ghostbusters, The Karate Kid, Beverly Hills Cop, and Police Academy. Comedies were probably the most notable feature of ’84. While the year didn’t produce any great American Film Institute darlings as weighty as Citizen Kane, it did, however, release an impressive number of comedies that are still fresh and still freakin’ funny today. Already mentioned are Ghostbusters, Beverly Hills Cop, and Police Academy; but also there are All of Me, This is Spinal Tap, Splash, Revenge of the Nerds, and Romancing the Stone.

1984 didn’t just release blockbusters that kept bottom line obsessed studio heads filled with coke and lap dancing blonds, it also saw the release of some lesser known films that have endured to become classics, films such as Sergio Leone’s Once Upon a Time in America; Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas; Jim Jarmusch’s Stranger Than Paradise. And the cult classics such as John Sayles The Brother from Another Planet, and the NYC cult horror flick C.H.U.D.

1984 saw Regan era teen angst approach its peak, while the John Hughes’ teen classic, Sixteen Candles, solidified Molly Ringwald as the ’80s’ ginger teen queen and—along with Weird Science that same year—shot Anthony Michael Hall to geek teen stardom, as its new nerd on the rise. The Karate Kid taught us to “Wax on, Wax off,” and A Nightmare on Elm Street introduced slasher fans to a terrifying new evil villain, Freddy Krueger, who entered our nightmares and has remained with us nine sequels later. Not only did teen anxiety influence cinema, but also the collective unease of the Cold War, as 1984 released a cinematic Soviet Union invasion of the U.S.A. in cinematographer and director John Milius’s Red Dawn. The first film to receive a PG-13 rating, Red Dawn was perhaps a bit unbelievable but cathartic, and filled with up-and-coming young stars (Patrick Swayze, Jennifer Grey, and Charlie Sheen); it was a definite reaction to the Cold War anxieties of the 1980s.

 
Sixteen Candles, Molly Ringwald

1984 was a year of movies filled with classic pop music in such films such as Prince’s Purple Rain, which produced an enduring soundtrack that still holds up today. The concert film Stop Making Sense featured the Talking Heads and was directed by a relative newcomer, Jonathan Demme. Beat Street and Breakin’ capitalized on the popularity of break dancing, and Footloose danced into theaters with its MTV look and a soundtrack that garnered six Billboard magazine top 40 hits. Footloose was promoted again and again; each subsequent music video featured clips from the film, and ultimately kept those bottom-line-obsessed studio heads “Dancing in the Sheets,” and laid the foundation for Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon.

In celebration of that most unforgettable year, I have listed my twenty essential movies of 1984, films that have endured, some that are well crafted, some that capture the spirit of the ’80s—thirty-year-old movies that make us think, sing, dance, scream and, above all else, laugh out loud!
—John David West

David’s 20 Essential Movies of 1984

Ghostbusters

Paris, Texas

Amadeus

The Killing Fields

Once Upon a Time in America

Stop Making Sense


The Terminator

 

This Is Spinal Tap

Beverly Hills Cop


The Karate Kid


Sixteen Candles



Footloose


A Nightmare on Elm Street


Stranger Than Paradise


Purple Rain
Starman


Gremlins


Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom


The Muppets Take Manhattan


Police Academy

 

 

Click here from more movies from 1984 at IMDB, it’s amazing!

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1984: A Blockbuster Year

“My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today that I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.” Ronald Reagan brought that oops moment to the world as he tested a microphone before a radio address; later that November Regan won a landslide re-election. That was the peak of the Reagan era. That was 1984.

1984 was, indeed, an unforgettable year!Mary Lou Retton won gymnastic gold and American hearts at the L.A. Olympics. The reining Miss America, Vanessa Williams, was stripped of her title because of a nude photo spread in Penthouse magazine. Madonna became everyone’s “boy toy” with her “Like a Virgin” performance at the MTV Video Music Awards. Marvin Gaye was killed by his father; Bernie Goetz gunned down four muggers in the NYC subway; millions starved in Ethiopia; and Bob Geldoff responded with “Do They Know it’s Christmas Time.” Thousands died in the Union Carbide Corporation disaster in Bhopal, India; and Clara Peller asked, “Where’s the Beef?” Cindy Lauper proclaimed that “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”; Prince let us know what it sounds like “When Doves Cry”; and Tina Turner made a big comeback and asked, “What’s Love Got To Do With It?

Clearly, 1984 was a year of big news, big events, and, thanks to the number one TV show, Dynasty, really of big shoulder pads! But as the ashes of have long since settled, it’s ’84’s hit movies that remain with us and have stood the test of time.

Besides being the year that introduced the first PG-13 movie, (Red Dawn), 1984 was the birth year for a number of hit features that spawned numerous sequels: The Terminator, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Ghostbusters, The Karate Kid, Beverly Hills Cop, and Police Academy. Comedies were probably the most notable feature of ’84. While the year didn’t produce any great American Film Institute darlings as weighty as Citizen Kane, it did, however, release an impressive number of comedies that are still fresh and still freakin’ funny today. Already mentioned are Ghostbusters, Beverly Hills Cop, and Police Academy; but also there are All of Me, This is Spinal Tap, Splash, Revenge of the Nerds, and Romancing the Stone.

1984 didn’t just release blockbusters that kept bottom line obsessed studio heads filled with coke and lap dancing blonds, it also saw the release of some lesser known films that have endured to become classics, films such as Sergio Leone’s Once Upon a Time in America; Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas; Jim Jarmusch’s Stranger Than Paradise. And the cult classics such as John Sayles The Brother from Another Planet, and the NYC cult horror flick C.H.U.D.

1984 saw Regan era teen angst approach its peak, while the John Hughes’ teen classic, Sixteen Candles, solidified Molly Ringwald as the ’80s’ ginger teen queen and—along with Weird Science that same year—shot Anthony Michael Hall to geek teen stardom, as its new nerd on the rise. The Karate Kid taught us to “Wax on, Wax off,” and A Nightmare on Elm Street introduced slasher fans to a terrifying new evil villain, Freddy Krueger, who entered our nightmares and has remained with us nine sequels later. Not only did teen anxiety influence cinema, but also the collective unease of the Cold War, as 1984 released a cinematic Soviet Union invasion of the U.S.A. in cinematographer and director John Milius’s Red Dawn. The first film to receive a PG-13 rating, Red Dawn was perhaps a bit unbelievable but cathartic, and filled with up-and-coming young stars (Patrick Swayze, Jennifer Grey, and Charlie Sheen); it was a definite reaction to the Cold War anxieties of the 1980s.

 
Sixteen Candles, Molly Ringwald

1984 was a year of movies filled with classic pop music in such films such as Prince’s Purple Rain, which produced an enduring soundtrack that still holds up today. The concert film Stop Making Sense featured the Talking Heads and was directed by a relative newcomer, Jonathan Demme. Beat Street and Breakin’ capitalized on the popularity of break dancing, and Footloose danced into theaters with its MTV look and a soundtrack that garnered six Billboard magazine top 40 hits. Footloose was promoted again and again; each subsequent music video featured clips from the film, and ultimately kept those bottom-line-obsessed studio heads “Dancing in the Sheets,” and laid the foundation for Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon.

In celebration of that most unforgettable year, I have listed my twenty essential movies of 1984, films that have endured, some that are well crafted, some that capture the spirit of the ’80s—thirty-year-old movies that make us think, sing, dance, scream and, above all else, laugh out loud!
—John David West

David’s 20 Essential Movies of 1984

Ghostbusters

Paris, Texas

Amadeus

The Killing Fields

Once Upon a Time in America

Stop Making Sense


The Terminator

 

This Is Spinal Tap

Beverly Hills Cop


The Karate Kid


Sixteen Candles



Footloose


A Nightmare on Elm Street


Stranger Than Paradise


Purple Rain
Starman


Gremlins


Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom


The Muppets Take Manhattan


Police Academy

 

 

Click here from more movies from 1984 at IMDB, it’s amazing!

Permanent Vacation: The Films of Jim Jarmusch April 2-10

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER Presents

Permanent Vacation: The Films of Jim Jarmusch
April 2-10


 

Complete retrospective will include all 11 features, plus short films and music videos, as well as appearances by Jarmusch – all leading up to the release of his latest film, NYFF Favorite Only Lovers Left Alive, at the Film Society on April 11

Jarmusch’s latest genre reinvention, Only Lovers Left Alive, a paean to the pleasures of long-term relationships in the guise of a vampire movie, was a selection of the 2013 New York Film Festival, the fifth of the longtime New York City resident’s films to screen at the NYFF. The others, all screening in the retrospective, are Stranger Than Paradise (1984), the indie classic that established his signature style; his Louisiana-set comedy, Down by Law (1986), starring John Lurie, Tom Waits, and Roberto Benigni; Mystery Train (1989), his portrait of misfits and foreigners adrift in the land of Elvis; and Night On Earth (1991), his exploration of cross-cultural communication by way of five taxicab vignettes set in L.A., New York, Paris, Rome, and Helsinki.

Tickets and a discount package for the series will go on sale Thursday, March 20. Single screening tickets are $13; $9 for students and seniors (62+); and $8 for Film Society members. Discount packages start at $30; $24 for students and seniors (62+); and $21 for Film Society members. Discount prices apply with the purchase of tickets to three films or more. Visit FilmLinc.com for more information.

 

FILMS, DESCRIPTIONS and SCHEDULE
BROKEN FLOWERS (2005) 

Jarmusch’s first full-length collaboration with Bill Murray (after the latter’s memorable turn in COFFEE AND CIGARETTES) was this tender, melancholic road movie.

Screening with
INT. TRAILER. NIGHT. (2002)
An actress (Chloë Sevigny) attempts to take a cigarette break in her trailer on a film set.   
Sunday, April 6 at 6:00PM
Wednesday, April 9 at 1:15PM
COFFEE AND CIGARETTES (2003)
Jarmusch’s films all depend to some extent on the appeal of watching ineffably cool people doing very little, but none more than this patchwork quilt of coffee-fueled conversations, hangout sessions, and chance encounters. Iggy Pop and Tom Waits make hilariously stilted small talk in a roadside diner.
Screening with
THE GARAGE TAPES (1992)
Three short films featuring Tom Waits.
Thursday, April 10 at 1:15PM
Thursday, April 10 at 9:00PM
DEAD MAN (1995)

Jarmusch’s career took a decisive turn with what has come to be recognized as his masterpiece: a hypnotic, parable-like revisionist Western about the spiritual rebirth of a dying 19th-century accountant (Johnny Depp) named William Blake (no relation—or is there?).

Screening with
Neil Young – Dead Man Score (1995) 
Saturday, April 5 at 9:00PM
Sunday, April 6 at 1:15PM
Wednesday, April 9 at 6:30PM (Q&A with Jim Jarmusch)
Thursday, April 10 at 3:45PM
DOWN BY LAW (1986)
Jarmusch re-teamed with John Lurie after the breakthrough success of STRANGER THAN PARADISE for this pitch-perfect Louisiana-set comic odyssey, shot in stunning black-and-white by Robby Müller.
Screening with
Tom Waits – It’s Alright with Me (1990) 5 min
Wednesday, April 2 at 1:30PM
Wednesday, April 9 at 9:30PM (Intro by Jim Jarmusch)
GHOST DOG: THE WAY OF THE SAMURAI (1999)  

“Even if one’s head were to be suddenly cut off, he should be able to do one more action with certainty.” Jarmusch’s first narrative feature after DEAD MAN was another revisionist genre film: a mashup of the mob movie and samurai film with one foot placed in ’60s hit man chic (Melville’s LE SAMOURAI and Suzuki’s BRANDED TO KILL are two key reference points) and the other in ’90s hip-hop culture (the soundtrack is by RZA, of Wu-Tang fame).

Screening with
Big Audio Dynamite – Sightsee M.C. (1987)
Friday, April 4 at 1:30PM
Friday, April 4 at 9:15PM
Thursday, April 10 at 6:30PM
THE LIMITS OF CONTROL (2009)
In DEAD MAN, Jarmusch rebuilt the Western from the inside out; 14 years later, he did the same for the espionage thriller. THE LIMITS OF CONTROL, gorgeously shot by Wong Kar-wai’s DP of choice Christopher Doyle, is a spy film gutted of action, a mystery that takes place almost entirely in the time between plot points, a James Bond movie whose Bond hails from the Ivory Coast rather than Scotland.
Screening with
The Raconteurs – Steady as She Goes (2006) 4 min
Sunday, April 6 at 8:30PM
Wednesday, April 9 at 3:45PM
MYSTERY TRAIN (1989)

MYSTERY TRAIN, like DOWN BY LAW, is a small group portrait of misfits and foreigners adrift in the American South. Here the setting has shifted to Memphis, the cast has widened, and the mood has slightly darkened. A young, rock ’n’ roll–obsessed Japanese couple (Masatoshi Nagase and Yûki Kudô) make a trans-Pacific pilgrimage to the home of (for her) Elvis and (for him) Carl Perkins.

Screening with
JOE STRUMMER — WHEN PIGS FLY (1993) 30 min
A documentary of Joe Strummer recording the score to Sara Driver’s film WHEN PIGS FLY.
Thursday, April 3 at 3:30PM
Saturday, April 5 at 6:00PM
NIGHT ON EARTH (1991)
Each of Jarmusch’s films leading up to NIGHT ON EARTH had dealt to some degree with urban disconnect and the possibility of cross-cultural communication—a tendency that climaxed with this set of five taxicab vignettes set in L.A., New York, Paris, Rome, and Helsinki. Tonally, NIGHT ON EARTH veers from broad comedy—Roberto Benigni telling increasingly outré yarns from his sexual history—to more sober territory.
Screening with
Tom Waits – I Don’t Wanna Grow Up (1992) 3 min
Wednesday, April 2 at 4:00PM
Friday, April 4 at 6:30PM

Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton make a dashing and very literal first couple—centuries-old lovers Adam and Eve—in Jim Jarmusch’s wry, tender take on the vampire genre. When we first meet the pair, he’s making rock music in Detroit while she’s hanging out with an equally ageless Christopher Marlowe (John Hurt) in Tangiers. (Long-distance spells aren’t such a big deal when you’ve been together throughout hundreds of years.) Between sips of untainted hospital-donated blood, they struggle with depression and an ever-changing world, reflect on their favorite humans (Buster Keaton, Albert Einstein, Jack White), and watch time go by, each finding stability in the other. ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE is Jarmusch at his most personal and emotionally direct: a fond, wistful portrait of (extremely) long-term coupledom and a tribute, alternately funny and melancholic, to the works of art and the acts of love that might make life worth living forever.

Showtimes TBD. Check filmlinc.com for details.

 

PERMANENT VACATION (1980)
Jarmusch’s debut feature: 75 minutes of frayed downtown cool. Aloysius Parker (Chris Parker) is the prototype for many of Jarmusch’s subsequent loner heroes: he loafs aimlessly around his scuzzy apartment and crumbling New York streets reading French poetry, flirting with cute girls at Nicholas Ray screenings, stealing cars, and obsessing over his half-punk, half-dandy image. For all its youthful self-seriousness (or maybe in part because of it), PERMANENT VACATION is a touching vision of what it was like to be head over heels with art, love, and oneself in late-1970s New York.
Screening with
Talking Heads – The Lady Don’t Mind (1986) 4 min
Wednesday, April 2 at 9:00PM
Sunday, April 6 at 4:00PM

 

STRANGER THAN PARADISE (1984)
Jarmusch established himself as a major new talent with this low-budget, black-and-white portrait of three directionless young people: a detached, world-weary New York hipster (John Lurie), his fedora’d best friend (Richard Edson), and his 16-year-old Hungarian cousin (Eszter Balint), who’s just landed in the States with an arsenal of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins tapes. With its careful mix of irony and pathos, STRANGER THAN PARADISE is one of the watershed American indie films of the 1980s.
Screening with
Talking Heads – The Lady Don’t Mind (1986) 4 min
Wednesday, April 2 at 7:00PM
Thursday, April 3 at 1:30PM

 

YEAR OF THE HORSE (1997)

A year after Neil Young provided the searing, largely improvised solo guitar soundtrack for DEAD MAN, Jarmusch made his only documentary to date: a scrapbook of interviews, archival clips, and concert footage of Young’s band Crazy Horse shot over the course of their 1996 world tour..

Screening with
Neil Young – Big Time (1996) 7 min
Thursday, April 3 at 9:00PM
Friday, April 4 at 4:00PM

PUBLIC SCREENING SCHEDULE

All screenings in the Walter Reade Theater

165 West 65th Street (between Broadway and Amsterdam)

DOWN BY LAW

Wednesday, April 2

1:30PM – DOWN BY LAW w/Tom Waits – It’s Alright with Me
4:00PM – NIGHT ON EARTH w/Tom Waits – I Don’t Wanna Grow Up
7:00PM – STRANGER THAN PARADISE w/Talking Heads – The Lady Don’t Mind
9:00PM – PERMANENT VACATION w/Talking Heads – The Lady Don’t Mind
 
Thursday, April 3
1:30PM – STRANGER THAN PARADISE w/Talking Heads – The Lady Don’t Mind
3:30PM – MYSTERY TRAIN) w/Joe Strummer – When Pigs Fly Score
9:00PM – YEAR OF THE HORSE w/Neil Young – Big Time
 
Friday, April 4
1:30PM – GHOST DOG: THE WAY OF THE SAMURAI w/Big Audio Dynamite – Sightsee M.C.
4:00PM – YEAR OF THE HORSE w/Neil Young – Big Time
6:30PM – NIGHT ON EARTH w/Tom Waits – I Don’t Wanna Grow Up
9:15PM – GHOST DOG: THE WAY OF THE SAMURAI w/Big Audio Dynamite – Sightsee M.C.
 
Saturday, April 5
6:00PM – MYSTERY TRAIN w/Joe Strummer – When Pigs Fly score
9:00PM – DEAD MAN w/Neil Young – Dead Man Score
 
Sunday, April 6
1:15PM – DEAD MAN (121 min) w/Neil Young – Dead Man Score 4:00PM – PERMANENT VACATION w/Talking Heads – The Lady Don’t Mind
6:00PM – BROKEN FLOWERS (106 min) w/INT. TRAILER. NIGHT. 8:30PM – THE LIMITS OF CONTROL w/The Raconteurs – Steady as She Goes
 
Monday, April 7
No Films of Jim Jarmusch screenings
 
Tuesday, April 8
No Films of Jim Jarmusch screenings
 
Wednesday, April 9
1:15PM – BROKEN FLOWERS w/INT. TRAILER. NIGHT.
3:45PM – THE LIMITS OF CONTROL w/The Raconteurs – Steady as She Goes
6:30PM – DEAD MAN w/Neil Young – Dead Man Score
9:30PM – DOWN BY LAW w/Tom Waits – It’s Alright with Me (5 min)
 
Thursday, April 10
1:15PM – COFFEE AND CIGARETTES w/THE GARAGE TAPES
3:45PM   DEAD MAN (w/Neil Young – Dead Man acore
6:30PM – GHOST DOG: THE WAY OF THE SAMURA w/Big Audio Dynamite – Sightsee M.C.
9:00PM – COFFEE AND CIGARETTES w/THE GARAGE TAPES